Newsletter – July 2009

From the Editor:

First of all, I would like to welcome the new people who have recently joined us. Welcome!

I am sorry this newsletter is coming out so late this month, but I still have a lot of plates spinning. The Eugene Chapter is a volunteer-run organization, and we appreciate all of our volunteers. Please consider helping out when you can.

Children’s Party in August

Next I’d like to tell you about a special event we have planned for August. The theme for our August potluck is a children’s party!

Children at our potlucks are frequently asked be quiet while the adults eat and have adult conversation. Now, this event is for them!

I would like to encourage everyone to come, whether you have young children or not. This is an opportunity to support local parents and the next generation of healthy children (and try some tasty food!).

Sustainable Lifestyles Festival Review

The Sustainable Lifestyles Festival last month was very good. Victoria taught her fermented foods class, Claudia video-taped some of the talks (which will hopefully show on cable-access TV sometime in the future), and I enjoyed a day out while my son stayed home with daddy. We met some interesting people, and heard some great speakers. Unfortunately the turn-out was low, and I don’t know if they will do it again.

I plan to share some of my notes and thoughts about the talks in an upcoming newsletter. Stay tuned!

Nourishing Traditions Childcare

Last October I wrote some of my thoughts about childcare, and about Dr. Price’s experiment with feeding a group of children one nutrition-packed meal a day.

Some other parents and I are in the process of creating our own cooperative childcare/homeschool. Our core principals are centered around respecting the children’s individuality, creative learning and Nourishing Traditions foods. If you would like to be involved or would like more information about this, please contact me (uncommon_interests@yahoo.com).

Now on to the events!
~ Lisa


July Events:

Meeting & Potluck Dinner

Monday, July 13, 2009
6:00 to 8:00 PM

Location:
At the home of Barb Shaw and Joe Henderson
61 West 34th, Eugene

We almost had to cancel our July potluck, due to lack of volunteers to host, but Barb and Joe came through for us at short notice!

Directions:
From down town Eugene, drive South on Willamette (Willamette and Donald split at a “Y” intersection, stay right to stay on Willamette). You will go past the big post office, which is on the left side of the street. Go up the hill and then turn right on W 35th. Go one block then turn right on McMillan. Go one block down the hill and you will be looking up their long driveway. On the asphalt, the numbers 65 and 61 are painted. Parking is limited so please park on the street and walk up the driveway. Please leave the spaces in the driveway for anyone who needs to park close to the house.

Walk, Bike or Bus:
If you are biking or walking, come in on 34th (no hills bumpy dirt lane). Bus #73 Willamette stops at 34th.

Phone:
Barb’s number is 541-344-9956

Bring Something to Share
Please bring a Nourishing Traditions-style dish and join us for some great food and great conversation! Families and guests are welcome. Please bring enough food to feed the size of your party, as well as your recipe on a 3×5 card or notepaper (Please include your name, and the source of the recipe. Be sure to give them to Lisa at the end of the evening. We are collecting these and plan to eventually compile a recipe book).

Upcoming Potlucks:
Our potluck meetings are regularly scheduled on the second Monday of each month. Our next potlucks will be (Sunday) August 16, September 14, and October 12 (mark your calendars now). We still need volunteers, so let us know if you are able to host an upcoming potluck.

New to all of this?
For those of you who are new to The Weston A. Price Foundation principals please see the Dietary Guidelines and Characteristics of Traditional Diets for a brief overview, and then get a copy of the book Nourishing Traditions for in-depth information and recipes.

RSVP:
We appreciate an RSVP (info@krautpounder.com) if you think you will be attending so that we have a rough idea of how many people to expect, but feel free to just show up.

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“The Popcorn Review”

“FRESH:
New Thinking About What We’re Eating”

by Ana Sophia Joanes

Friday, July 17, 2009
7:30 to 9:00 PM

Location:
Market of Choice
67 West 29th, Eugene
Upstairs in the Community Room

Fresh celebrates the farmers, thinkers and business people across America who are re-inventing our food system. Each has witnessed the rapid transformation of our agriculture into an industrial model, and confronted the consequences: food contamination, environmental pollution, depletion of natural resources, and morbid obesity. Forging healthier, sustainable alternatives, they offer a practical vision for a future of our food and our planet. Fresh addresses an ethos that has been sweeping the nation, and is a call-to-action America has been waiting for.”

Visit the Fresh website at:
www.freshthemovie.com

I haven’t had the opportunity to watch this movie yet, but the reviews from other WAPF folks have been great.

“This is a must-see, folks. Absolutely do not miss this movie. Not only is the film informative and captivating, it’s so emotionally powerful I was moved to tears more than once (okay, let’s be honest, my cheeks were wet throughout).”
Cheese Slave

“We all walked out of there feeling re-energized and inspired to continue on in our quest to help others make connections with their food and regain vibrant health!”
Kelly the Kitchen Kop

Ana Joanes on Huffington Post: New Thinking on What We’re Eating

Fresh examines the problems and consequences of our current food system, but its focus is on the farmers, thinkers, and business people across America who are coming up with alternatives. And although at first glance it may seem that Fresh is about food and agriculture, it’s really more about adopting a new perspective, a different understanding of our relationship to each other and the world. In short, Fresh seeks to empower us by showing how we are the creators of our reality, not passive by-standers to a world going nuts. And while being creators means taking responsibility for what’s happening, it also means we can change it (yes we can!).”

RSVP:
Space is limited and this is likely to be to be a popular showing, so I strongly urge you to RSVP (info@krautpounder.com) if you think you will be attending. If your plans change feel free to just show up, but only the first 25 people who have RSVP’d will have a space reserved.

We are requesting a $5-10 donation to the Eugene Chapter at the door.
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August Events:

Children’s Potluck Party!
(for children of all ages)

We have a special event planned for August. The theme for our potluck will be a child’s party! We plan to do special events such as making party hats, face-painting, and serve homemade ice cream!

Sunday, August 16, 2009
4:00 to 6:00

Location:
A Park in Eugene
(Day & time tentative – Suggestions welcome – Details to come in the August Newsletter)

Feeding Children.
One of the most important findings of Dr. Price’s research involves showing the absolutely disastrous effects the modern diet has on growing children. Raising children has probably always been a difficult job, but keeping children well-nourished in our modern world has its own unique challenges.

As parents who follow the teachings of the WAP Foundation, we are constantly challenged to keep our children eating well. Restaurants, schools, childcare, birthday parties, holidays with family and other events all force us to either sacrifice our principals or risk having our children resent our control over what foods they can eat. This event is intended to provide all of the fun without the sacrifice.

Everyone is welcome and encouraged to come, whether you have young children or not. This is an opportunity to support local parents and the next generation of healthy children (and try some tasty food yourself!). And I am sure that parents of young children will appreciate any good NT recipes or tips from parents who’s children are grown.

Bring Something to Share
Please bring a Nourishing Traditions-style nutrient-dense dish to feed growing children, and join us for some great food and fun! Families and guests are welcome. To avoid the possibility of too many sweet treats, we ask that any desserts you bring be accompanied by a dish that features meat and/or vegetables with plenty of healthy fats. Thanks.

Articles on Feeding Children:

Feeding Our Children
Foods to Tantalize Toddlers & Preschoolers
Taking the “Icky” Out of Picky Eaters
Dietary Recommendations for Children –A Recipe for Future Heart Disease?
Getting The Goods: Top Ten Tips

Please RSVP:
Because of the nature of this event, we need to have a better idea of how many people to expect. Please RSVP (info@krautpounder.com) if you think you will be attending, so that we have a rough idea of how many people are coming.

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[Kraut </p>
<p>Pounder]

Kraut Pounder

As a local fund-raiser, the Eugene Chapter produces the Kraut Pounder©.

Kraut Pounders are perfect for making sauerkraut, kimchi and other lacto-fermented foods.
They can be purchased at our local events, or ordered online and shipped anywhere.

For details see: www.krautpounder.com

Made in Eugene, by the Eugene Chapter, Weston A. Price Foundation®.

Volunteers Wanted

The Eugene Chapter is a volunteer-run organization, and we still have room for more volunteers.

Have you ever watched those performers who balance spinning plates on the tops of long poles? They keep running back and forth giving each plate a push to keep it spinning. If they spend too much time on any one plate the others start wobbling (or crashing down)…. Well that’s the way my life feels.

If you have time and energy to help out the Eugene Chapter, let us know. These are a few “plates” that need an occasional push:

  • Bookkeeping using QuickBooks
  • Host a potluck
  • Take notes at meetings
  • Phone call people without email
  • Help write the Newsletter
  • Assist with webpage design and/or updates
  • Organization
  • Plan food preparation classes
  • Play with my son while I do some of these things
  • And more… If you have other ideas just let us know.

Thanks!

Newsletter – June 2009

From the Editor:

Plate Spinners Wanted

Have you ever watched those performers who balance spinning plates on the tops of long poles? They keep running back and forth giving each plate a push to keep it spinning. If they spend too much time on any one plate the others start wobbling (or crashing down)…. Well that’s the way my life feels.

If you have time and energy to help out the Eugene Chapter, let us know. These are a few “plates” that need an occasional push:

  • Pack and ship Kraut Pounders
  • Bookkeeping using QuickBooks
  • Host a potluck
  • Take notes at meetings
  • Phone call people without email
  • Help write the Newsletter
  • Assist with webpage design and/or updates
  • Respond to emails
  • Organization
  • Plan food preparation classes
  • Play with my son while I do some of these things
  • And more… If you have other ideas just let us know.

We have room in this organization for all types of skills and involvement level, and appreciate any help you can offer. However if you are one of those people who’s life is so busy that adding one more thing will make some of your plates start to wobble or fall, don’t feel bad about not taking on any more. Taking care of yourself, feeding yourself and your family nutrient-dense food has to come first. Because when it comes right down to it that is what The Weston A. Price Foundation is all about.

Now, on to the events!
~ Lisa


June Events:

Meeting & Potluck Dinner

Monday, June 8, 2009
6:00 to 8:00 PM

Location:
At the home of Sara Reilly
2455 Emerald Alley, Eugene
(just south of the university)

Directions: From the corner of 24th and Hilyard, go East on 24th about 5 blocks. Pass University Ave, and Onyx Street. Turn right in the first alley after Onyx (it is unmarked). 2445 Emerald Alley is a big house on the left with a stone wall in front of it. It is about half way down the alley.

Please park on 24th or 25th street because there won’t be room for everyone in front of the house.

Phone:
Sara’s number is 345-6770

Bring a Dish
Please bring a Nourishing Traditions style dish and join us for some great food and great conversation! Families and guests are welcome. Please bring enough food to feed the size of your party, and your recipe on a 3×5 card or notepaper (Please include your name, and the source of the recipe. Be sure to give them to Lisa at the end of the evening. We are collecting these and plan to eventually compile a recipe book).

Upcoming Potlucks:
Our potluck meetings are regularly scheduled on the second Monday of each month. We still need volunteers to host potlucks in July and August. Let us know if you would like to host an upcoming potluck.

New to all of this?
For those of you who are new to The Weston A. Price Foundation principals please see the Dietary Guidelines and Characteristics of Traditional Diets for a brief overview, and then get a copy of the book Nourishing Traditions for in-depth information and recipes.

RSVP:
We appreciate an RSVP (info@krautpounder.com) if you think you will be attending so that we have a rough idea of how many people to expect, but feel free to just show up.

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“The Popcorn Review”

“Dental Obstacles to Mental and Emotional Health”

“How Malocclusions, Failed Root Canals and Other “Dominant Foci” Chronically Undermine Our Mental and Emotional Well-Being”

by Louisa Williams, ND

Friday, June 19, 2008
7:30 to 9:00 PM

Location:
Market of Choice
67 West 29th, Eugene
Upstairs in the Community Room

This is a DVD presentation from the Wise Traditions 2008 Conference.

Seventy to ninety percent of a person’s health problems are in their mouth.

In this talk Dr Williams addresses what she calls “Obstacles to Cure”. She says, when someone is eating a traditional diet but still challenged with health problems, consider something lurking in the mouth that is stopping you from getting the full benefit of the Weston A. Price diet.

“A picture is truly worth a thousand words. And nowhere is this more true than in the bright eyes and radiant smiles of the traditional peoples Dr. Weston Price photographed in the early 20th century. In stark contrast to the obvious vitality and aliveness seen in these individuals with excellent facial and cranial bone development, however, is the distress and agitation typically seen in the faces of those he photographed who ate a more “modern” and refined diet. But Dr. Price didn’t stop there. He also endeavored to correct the dental and bony malformations he observed in his American patients. In fact, he actually cured a case of mental retardation in one dramatic case by simply expanding the palate of a 16-year-old Down’s syndrome patient. This cranial expansion so enhanced brain functioning that this patient’s IQ changed from that of a four-year-old to that of a low-normal but functional teen in less than a year.Unfortunately, narrowed faces and airways, crowded teeth and dental malocclusions–“bad bites”–have become even more prevalent today. And to add further insult to injury, this lack of full physical and mental development is often later compounded in one’s teenage years by the classic orthodontic protocol: pulling four to eight teeth and then putting on braces and headgear. This archaic practice only further undermines growth and development, and limits the potential for future optimal health and happiness.

Price was not only a pioneer in orthopedic (as opposed to orthodontic) holistic dentistry, he was also a leading advocate of the “focal infection theory,” which was quite fiercely debated in the early 1900s. Price found that infected root canals could act as a chronic “focus of infection,” and demonstrated that they could cause distal symptoms in all areas of the body. Other common focal infections include the tonsils, sinuses, genitals and what the Germans have termed “scar interference fields.” Tonsil foci are particularly instrumental in triggering mental and emotional symptoms, including obsessive-compulsive tics and other manifestations commonly seen in Tourette’s, the hyperactivity of ADHD, and what has been described as “therapy-resistant” anxiety and depression.

In this session, Dr. Williams will cover the causes and effects of bad bites, along with tips on how to recognize whether you have a significant enough dental malocclusion that would require the skills of a holistic orthopedic dentist. She will also describe the most typical signs and symptoms of dental and tonsil focal infections, as well as the most conservative and efficacious treatments for both children and adults. Additionally, participants will learn a simple therapeutic home protocol for their scar interference fields to help reduce the insidious effect these scars can have on mental and emotional well-being.”

Louisa Williams currently practices as a naturopathic physician (Bastyr University) in Marin County, California. She also holds a Doctor of Chiropractic degree (Texas Chiropractic College) and a Master’s in counselling psychology (Purdue). She has lectured extensively in both Europe and America, and has published over 20 teaching manuals and recently authored her first book, Radical Medicine: Profound Intervention in a Profoundly Toxic Age.

Visit her website at:
radicalmedicine.com

We are requesting a $5-10 donation to the Eugene Chapter at the door.

RSVP:
We appreciate an RSVP (info@krautpounder.com) if you think you will be attending so that we have a rough idea of how many people to expect, but feel free to just show up.
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“Fermented Foods Workshop”

Victoria Schneider (Eugene Co-Chapter Leader) will be presenting a class in Fermentation at the Sustainable Lifestyles Festival.

Traditional people across the globe have used beneficial bacteria to enhance and preserve foods throughout the ages. Making fermented foods is easy with only a few tools and a minor understanding of food science. We will learn: Traditional sauerkraut with variations, Kim chi with a fruit variation, Beet Kvass, a traditional fermented beverage from Russia, and Ginger Carrots.

Date:
Sunday, June 28, 2009

Time:
12:00 PM – 2:00 PM

Cost:
$15 – $30 sliding scale

Details:
www.herbaltransitions.com/SustainableLifestylesinfo.html#fermentedfoods.
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“Sustainable Lifestyles Festival”

Dates:
Saturday, June 27, 2009
Sunday, June 28, 2009

Location:
Wise Acres Farm
84537 Proden Lane
Pleasant Hill, OR, 97455
541-736-0164

Details and Registration:
www.herbaltransitions.com/SustainableLifestyles.html
(Note: pre-registration discount if paid by June 10th)

This is not a Eugene Chapter event, but we thought it would be of interest to many local Chapter Members, and our very own Victoria Schneider will be teaching a fermentation class at this Festival.

This first time event will offer two days of lectures, panel discussions and hands-on workshops taught by a diverse array of renowned experts. There will be two days of lectures and workshops on skills necessary to live sustainably in the 21st century.

23 Lectures and 16 Workshops, including:

  • Opening Information & Community Connection
  • Indigenous Perspectives & Practices for a Regenerative & Sustainable Future
  • Staying Healthy Naturally
  • Beyond Recycling
  • Living Lightly
  • Pollinators: Honey Bees & Other Pollinators
  • Biofuel
  • Where Does Your Food Come From? (kids & adults)
  • Community Supported Agriculture
  • The Garden Game
  • Water Catchments
  • Artisan Cheese Making
  • Tools
  • Beer Brewing
  • Solar Shower
  • Plants for the People
  • Goat Husbandry
  • Going Green is not enough
  • Relocalizing Eden: Rebuilding Our Regional Food System
  • First Aid Naturally
  • An Update on Social Politics That Effects You
  • Raw Milk – The Udder Truth
  • Natural Dyeing of wool yarn
  • Bugscaping Game
  • Edible Wild Plant Walk
  • Farm Walk
  • Biodynamic Farming
  • Felting with wool (kids with parent)
  • Seed Balls and Garden Art (kids with parent)
  • Herb Garden
  • Rekindling the Fire: Making the Bow-drill
  • Invent A Culture
  • Compost Toilets
  • Kitchen Classroom
  • Seed Saving
  • Fermented Foods
  • Building with Cob
  • Pastured Poultry Production
  • Bees: The Other Way

Additional Contact Information:
Sharol Tilgner: 541-736-0164
Web: www.wiseacresfarm.com
Email: class@herbaltransitions.com

This sounds like a great event. I am looking forward to attending some of these lectures and workshops. I hope you will join us. See the eRideShare.com information, or let me know if you are interested in a carpool.
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[Kraut 

Pounder]

Kraut Pounder

Kraut Pounders are perfect for making sauerkraut, kimchi and other lacto-fermented foods.

They can be purchased at our local events, or ordered online and shipped anywhere.

For details see: www.krautpounder.com

Made in Eugene, by the Eugene Chapter, Weston A. Price Foundation.

Newsletter – May 2009

From the Editor:

My whole family has been sick these past few days, and our two big projects at work are both due this month, so I will save the topics I intended to write about for a future newsletter.


~ Lisa


May Events:

Meeting & Potluck Dinner

Monday, May 11, 2008
6:00 to 8:00 PM

Location:
At the home of Gina Aramburu
7273 Holly Street, Springfield

Directions: Head east on Main Street in Springfield, and then take a right at 72nd. Go almost all the way to the top of the hill and turn left on Holly (last left turn). House has wood shingles and green trim, and there’s a piece of green stained glass in the window above the garage. Park anywhere on the street.

Phone:
Gina’s number is 360-393-2431

Please give Gina a special thanks for agreeing to host this month’s potluck on short notice after our previously scheduled host had to cancel.

Bring a Dish
Please bring a Nourishing Traditions style dish and join us for some great food and great conversation! Families and guests are welcome. Please bring enough food to feed the size of your party, and your recipe on a 3×5 card or notepaper (Please include your name, and the source of the recipe. Be sure to give them to Lisa at the end of the evening. We are collecting these and will eventually compile a recipe book).

Upcoming Potlucks:
Our potluck meetings are regularly scheduled on the second Monday of each month. The next potluck will be June 8 (mark your calendars). We still need volunteers to host potlucks on July 13 and August 10. Let us know if you would like to host an upcoming potluck.

New to all of this?
For those of you who are new to The Weston A. Price Foundation principals please see the Dietary Guidelines and Characteristics of Traditional Diets for a brief overview, and then get a copy of the book Nourishing Traditions for in-depth information and recipes.

RSVP:
We appreciate an RSVP (info@krautpounder.com) if you think you will be attending so that we have a rough idea of how many people to expect, but feel free to just show up.

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“The Popcorn Review”

“A Holistic Approach to Treating Thyroid Disorders:
The Iodine Connection”

by David Brownstein, MD

Friday, May 15, 2008
7:30 to 9:00 PM

Location:
Market of Choice
67 West 29th, Eugene
Upstairs in the Community Room

This is a DVD presentation from the Wise Traditions 2008 Conference.

“This talk will focus on how to integrate a holistic treatment plan to effectively treat thyroid disorders. Dr. Brownstein will discuss the diagnosis and treatment of hypothyroidism and why conventional medicine misses more than 40 percent of the people suffering from hypothyroidism. Furthermore, he will show you why it is impossible to treat thyroid problems without first ensuring adequate iodine intake. Finally, he will show you the relationship between thyroid and adrenal disorders.”

“David Brownstein, MD, is a Board-Certified family physician who utilizes the best of conventional and alternative therapies. He is the Medical Director for the Center for Holistic Medicine in West Bloomfield, Michigan. He is a graduate of the University of Michigan and Wayne State University School of Medicine. Dr. Brownstein is a member of the American Academy of Family Physicians and the American College for the Advancement in Medicine. He is the father of two beautiful girls, Hailey and Jessica, and is a retired soccer coach. Dr. Brownstein has lectured internationally about his success using natural remedies.”

Dr. Brownstein has authored eight books:

  • Iodine: Why You Need It, Why You Can’t Live Without It
  • Drugs That Don’t Work and Natural Therapies That Do
  • The Miracle of Natural Hormones
  • Overcoming Thyroid Disorders
  • Overcoming Arthritis
  • Salt Your Way to Health
  • The Guide To Healthy Eating
  • The Guide to a Gluten-Free Diet

Visit his websites at:
www.centerforholisticmedicine.com
www.drbrownstein.com

We are requesting a $5-10 donation to the Eugene Chapter at the door.
Space is limited, so please contact us to reserve your seat.
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Upcoming Event:

“Sustainable Lifestyles Festival”

Victoria Schneider will be presenting a class in Fermentation at the Sustainable Lifestyles Festival.

Sustainable Lifestyles Festival
Dates:

Saturday, June 27, 2009
Sunday, June 28, 2009

Location:
Wise Acres Farm
Pleasant Hill, Oregon

Contact Information:
Sharol Tilgner: 541-736-0164
Web: www.wiseacresfarm.com
Email: class@herbaltransitions.com

For details and registration, please see: www.herbaltransitions.com/SustainableLifestyles.html

More details will be posted in the June newsletter.

Newsletter – April 2009

From the Editor:

I have frequently wished that all of the sessions at Wise Traditions Conferences were video recorded. We show conference DVDs at our monthly “Popcorn Review” DVD showings, but there are about four times as many audio recordings as there are sessions available in DVD format.

I purchased all of the audio recordings from the 2006, 2007 and 2008 Wise Traditions Conferences, and have been enjoying listening to them on a portable audio (MP3) player.

It recently occurred to me that a way to share these recordings would be with the use of a portable audio player, so I have decided to offer the use of one to local members.

Audio (MP3) Player for Rent

Details: The audio player may be rented for $7.00 per week. I will include your choice of one file loaded on the device. Most presentations are either an hour and a half or two hours long. Some include three sessions in one file and may be up to seven and a half hours long. I will load additional files for an additional $4.00 each.

There are many great speakers. You can view the complete list of available presentations on the Audio Recordings page. The small size of this audio player makes it easy to put it into a pocket and listen while walking, cooking, gardening or whenever it is convenient. Contact me at: uncommon_interests@yahoo.com if you would like to make a reservation.
~ Lisa


April Events:

Meeting & Potluck Dinner

Monday, April 13, 2008
6:00 to 8:00 PM

Location:
At the home of Dr. Teri Sue Wright, DVM
2919 McKendrick St.
(in south Eugene)

Directions:
“South Chambers straight through the 28th St intersection (blinking light). Take a right onto McLean (3rd street passed that intersection). Take the 1st right on McKendrick. My house is about 8 houses down (1/2 way) on the right. A large telephone pole marks the top of my driveway. Tan house w/ black trim and red doors; the house sets down off the road. Feel free to park in the driveway, OK to park on the right side of the driveway a little ways onto the grass.”

Phone:
Teri Sue’s number is 343-5028

Bring a Dish
Please bring a Nourishing Traditions style dish and join us for some great food and great conversation! Families and guests are welcome. Please bring enough food to feed the size of your party, and your recipe on a 3×5 card or notepaper (Please include your name, and the source of the recipe. We are collecting these and will eventually compile a recipe book).

Upcoming Potlucks:
Our potluck meetings are regularly scheduled on the second Monday of each month. The next potluck will be May 11 (mark your calendars). We still need volunteers to host potlucks on May 11, June 8 and July 13. Let us know if you would like to host an upcoming potluck.

New to all of this?
For those of you who are new to The Weston A. Price Foundation principals please see the Dietary Guidelines and Characteristics of Traditional Diets for a brief overview, and then get a copy of the book Nourishing Traditions for in-depth information and recipes.

RSVP:
We appreciate an RSVP (info@krautpounder.com) if you think you will be attending so that we have a rough idea of how many people to expect, but feel free to just show up.

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“The Popcorn Review”

“The Perfect Storm, 1970-2000:
The Breast, Iodine Deficiency and Bromide Dominance”

by Lynne Farrow, MA

Friday, April 24, 2008
7:30 to 9:00 PM

Location:
Market of Choice
67 West 29th, Eugene
Upstairs in the Community Room

This is a DVD presentation from the Wise Traditions 2008 Conference.

“Breast Cancer rates rose from one in 23 to one in seven over the last 30 years. During this time, the nutrient, iodine, was removed from the food supply and the “anti-iodine,” toxin, bromide, was introduced widely into many consumer products. Stealth (unlabeled) bromide exposure from fire-retardants surrounds us in our daily life to a degree unacceptable in some other countries. The presentation will first explore how bromide dominance may function as the biochemical equivalent of global warming as iodine-deficient women reach the age for breast and other hormone-sensitive cancers. Next, we will explore how some forms of benign breast disease can represent a precancerous condition by examining research on iodine and the breast from 1954 to the present. Finally, we will show how at-risk breast patients have used iodine to improve or reverse fibrocystic breast disease.”

“Lynne Farrow, MA, is a former college professor, journalist and editor. She currently serves as Director of the nonprofit research and advocacy organization, Breast Cancer Choices. She has moderated the Amazon Breast Cancer Internet Group for many years and investigated research for integrative therapies. In 2005, Breast Cancer Choices launched a patient-driven research initiative, The Iodine Investigation Project. This database study follows women using iodine as a part of their therapy strategy for breast disease, with an emphasis on breast cancer. The organization is the first cancer advocacy group to conduct a database study by patients for patients. Lynne also moderates Breast Cancer Think Tank, an information-oriented Internet discussion group exploring articles, studies, therapies, ideas and medical conference speeches.”

Visit her website at:
www.breastcancerchoices.org

We are requesting a $5-10 donation to the Eugene Chapter at the door.
Space is limited, so please contact us to reserve your seat.
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Upcoming Events:

“The Popcorn Review”

“A Holistic Approach to Treating Thyroid Disorders:
The Iodine Connection”

A DVD presentation by David Brownstein, MD.

Friday, May 15, 2008
7:30 to 9:00 PM

More details will be coming in the May issue of the Eugene Chapter Newsletter.

 


 

“Sustainable Lifestyles Festival”

Victoria Schneider will be presenting a class in Fermentation at the Sustainable Lifestyles Festival.

Sustainable Lifestyles Festival
Dates:

Saturday, June 27, 2009
Sunday, June 28, 2009

Location:
Wise Acres Farm
Pleasant Hill, Oregon

Contact Information:
Sharol Tilgner: 541-736-0164
Web: www.wiseacresfarm.com
Email: class@herbaltransitions.com

For details and registration, please see: www.herbaltransitions.com/SustainableLifestyles.html

This first time event will offer two days of lectures, panel discussions and hands-on workshops taught by a diverse array of renowned experts. There will be two days of lectures and workshops on skills necessary to live sustainably in the 21st century.

23 Lectures and 16 Workshops, including:

  • Opening Information & Community Connection
  • Indigenous Perspectives & Practices for a Regenerative & Sustainable Future
  • Staying Healthy Naturally
  • Beyond Recycling
  • Living Lightly
  • Pollinators: Honey Bees & Other Pollinators
  • Biofuel
  • Where Does Your Food Come From?(kids & adults)
  • Community Supported Agriculture
  • The Garden Game
  • Water Catchments
  • Artisan Cheese Making
  • Tools
  • Beer Brewing
  • Solar Shower
  • Plants for the People
  • Goat Husbandry
  • Going Green is not enough
  • Relocalizing Eden: Rebuilding Our Regional Food System
  • First Aid Naturally
  • An Update on Social Politics That Effects You
  • Raw Milk – The Udder Truth
  • Natural Dyeing of wool yarn
  • Bugscaping Game
  • Edible Wild Plant Walk
  • Farm Walk
  • Biodynamic Farming
  • Felting with wool(kids with parent)
  • Seed Balls and Garden Art (kids with parent)
  • Herb Garden
  • Rekindling the Fire: Making the Bow-drill
  • Invent A Culture
  • Compost Toilets
  • Kitchen Classroom
  • Seed Saving
  • Fermented Foods
  • Building with Cob
  • Pastured Poultry Production
  • Bees: The Other Way

 

This sounds like a great event. I am looking forward to attending some of these lectures and workshops. I hope you will join us.

Victoria’s Fermented Foods workshop will be Sunday 12:00 PM – 2:00 PM. For more details please see: www.herbaltransitions.com/SustainableLifestylesinfo.html#fermentedfoods.

Newsletter – March 2009

 

From the Editor:

Organicology Conference

Victoria and I (your Eugene Chapter Leaders) staffed a booth for the Weston A. Price Foundation at the Organicology Conference in Portland at the end of February.

The event was well attended, and once Victoria solved the problem of a very annoying loudspeaker right behind our heads we had a good time. We met many people interesting people and did our best to introduce them to the nutritional principals discovered by Dr. Price.

Welcome to the new members who found us there!

Vitamin D Testing

Since its inception, The Weston A. Price Foundation has been urging us to include adequate fat-soluble vitamins in our diet, and to have our Vitamin D levels tested. I just heard about this great source for vitamin D testing.

See www.grassrootshealth.org for more information.

A Consortium of Scientists, Institutions and Individuals Committed to Solving the Worldwide Vitamin D Deficiency EpidemicScientists are calling for a standard vitamin D intake of 2000 IU/day and the achievement of a serum level of 40-60 ng/ml.

GrassrootsHealth has launched a worldwide public health campaign to solve the vitamin D deficiency epidemic in a year through a focus on testing and education with all individuals spreading the word.

Everyone is invited to join in this campaign! Join Daction and test two times per year during a 5 year program to demonstrate the public health impact of this nutrient.

$30.00 and a quick health survey allows everyone to:

  • get a vitamin D blood spot test kit to be used at home
  • have the results sent directly to them
  • take action to adjust their own levels to get to the desired ranges with whatever help is needed from their healthcare practitioners.

I have previously had this test done for $69 through DirectLabs.com, but now you can have the test done through GrassrootsHealth.org for only $30, and help scientists gather valuable data in the process!
~ Lisa


March Events:

Meeting & Potluck Dinner

Monday, March 9, 2008
6:00 to 8:00 PM

Location:
At the home of Barb Shaw and Joe Henderson
61 West 34th, Eugene

Directions:
From downtown Eugene, drive South on Willamette (Willamette and Donald split at a “Y” intersection, stay right to stay on Willamette). You will go past the big post office, which is on the left side of the street. Go up the hill and then turn right on W 35th. Go one block then turn right on McMillan. Go one block down the hill and you will be looking up their long driveway. On the asphalt, the numbers 65 and 61 are painted. Parking is limited so please park on the street and walk up the driveway. Please leave the spaces in the driveway for anyone who needs to park close to the house.

Walk, Bike or Bus:
If you are biking or walking, come in on 34th. Bus #73 Willamette stops at 34th.

Phone:
Barb’s number is 344-9956

Bring a Dish
Please bring a Nourishing Traditions style dish and join us for some great food and great conversation! Families and guests are welcome. Please bring enough food to feed the size of your party, and your recipe on a 3×5 card or notepaper (Please include your name, and the source of the recipe. We are collecting these and will eventually compile a recipe book).

Upcoming Potlucks:
Our potluck meetings are regularly scheduled on the second Monday of each month. The next potluck will be April 13, at Teri Sue’s house. We still need volunteers to host potlucks on May 11 and June 8. Let us know if you would like to host an upcoming potluck.

New to all of this?
For those of you who are new to The Weston A. Price Foundation principals please see the Dietary Guidelines and Characteristics of Traditional Diets for a brief overview, and then get a copy of the book Nourishing Traditions for in-depth information and recipes.

RSVP:
We appreciate an RSVP (info@krautpounder.com) if you think you will be attending so that we have a rough idea of how many people to expect, but feel free to just show up.

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“The Popcorn Review”

“Manageable Mozzarellia”

by Katherine Mowbray

Friday, March 20, 2008
7:30 to 9:00 PM

Location:
Market of Choice
67 West 29th, Eugene
Upstairs in the Community Room

Now for something a little different, we’ll take a break from our in-depth nutritional education to learn about cheese making! This is a DVD presentation from the Wise Traditions 2008 Conference.

“This session will be a demonstration on how manageable it is to get started making your own cheese. During the process Katherine Mowbray will talk about and explain the basic principles of home cheese making. Just using two liters of milk, we will make fresh, hand-stretched “Mozzarellia” (so-called because we are not in Italy and we are not using Buffalo milk). This cheese can be enjoyed with fresh herbs, tomatoes and olive oil, or placed on your homemade pizza.”

“Katherine Mowbray likes to work with people from all walks of life to promote and educate them about cheese and milk delicacies, so that people have the confidence and skills to make their own. She feels that it is important to keep this ancient art of cheese making alive and well and in the grasp of people’s hands today. Technology, commercialism and modern culinary practices are far removed from the artisan cheese maker. Katherine puts people in touch with something that is real and makes possible for them the craft of cheese making. She lives in New Zealand, makes cheese on a small scale and travels the country teaching.”

We are requesting a $5-10 donation to the Eugene Chapter at the door.
Space is limited, so please contact us to reserve your seat.
Return to top of page


 

Other Sources and Information

As a Chapter Leader, I frequently receive emails from people and organizations that want me to pass some information on to you. Please see the December, January and February issues for more information.

 

Learn more about NAIS at: www.ftcldf.org/nais.html

Reasons to Stop the NAIS

(National Animal Identification System)

This costly and poorly conceived program is now mandatory in some states. It requires farmers to tag each animal, in most cases using electronic identification, and report off-farm movements to a database via computer. Here are ten good reasons to nip this program in the bud.

  1. Not needed.  We have existing tracking systems that have met our needs for decades.
  2. Expensive.  The government has spent over $100 million on just the first stage so far, with no cost-benefit analysis.  The costs of the whole program could easily be $37 or more per animal, creating a multi-billion dollar expense that will ultimately be paid through increased taxes and costs of food.
  3. Technology-dependent.  NAIS requires computers and internet access.  Amish farmers don’t have electricity, and many other farmers don’t have or want internet access.  This program makes high-tech companies rich, at the expense of everyone else.
  4. Corporate welfare.  The factory farms get to use “group identification”, while small farmers are stuck tagging each animal.
  5. Won’t improve food safety.  The tags are removed at the slaughterhouse, so NAIS does not improve our ability to track animals into the food chain.  It’s won’t prevent sick animals from being used for human consumption and won’t prevent or improve recalls.
  6. Will reduce food safety and choices!  Because of its high costs and government intrusion, NAIS will drive small farmers out of business, reducing people’s ability to buy local foods directly from farmers.  Eating local is your best way to “source verify” your food!
  7. Animal welfare.  Studies indicate that microchips may cause cancer in animals.  And by continuing to push farmers to “get big or get out”, NAIS will increase the number of animals in inhumane factory farm system.
  8. Exploding government bureaucracy.
  9. Religious freedom.  Many Amish, Mennonites, and other Christian farmers consider the mandatory microchipping to be the fulfillment of Revelations, and they cannot comply.
  10.  Privacy and property rights.  NAIS would create the first permanent federal registration system for land and personal property.  It would require reporting of normal, daily events in people’s lives – buying or selling an animal, taking horses to shows, or providing food for their own table.
  11. Impossible to implement.   The USDA can’t monitor what is being done to cows in 100 slaughter plants. How can they keep track of 180 million animals (and billions of chickens) on more than a million farms?  The only country to implement electronic tagging of cattle, Australia, has a database that is in chaos.
  12. Impossible to enforce.  The government says they don’t have the resources to enforce the current laws, including inspecting imported foods and slaughterhouses in this country!  NAIS will create a black market for animal ownership and make lawbreakers out of ordinary citizens.
  13. Where does it end?  Some of the same high-tech companies want to microchip humans, and are already pushing to microchip children, the elderly and prisoners.

The Weston A. Price Foundation sent out the following two announcements out to all members. I’ve already called our Senators. I hope you will too.

Sen. Ron Wyden – Phone:(503) 326-7525 Website: http://merkley.senate.gov/
Sen. Jeff Merkley – Phone: (503) 326-3386 Website: http://wyden.senate.gov/

From The Weston A. Price Foundation®

Action Alert: NAIS in Appropriations Bill

The 2009 omnibus Appropriations bill, HR 1105, passed the House last week. The bill includes $14.5 million of funding for NAIS, which is significantly less than the amount requested by the USDA for FY 2009.

Representative Obey (D-WI) included a statement in the record about the intended uses of the appropriations for the USDA, including timelines and performance goals for NAIS. This statement does not mandate NAIS because it is not part of the bill itself. But it implies approval of USDA’s Business Plan and pushes USDA to move forward with implementing it, including the use of existing disease control programs and other coercive tactics to implement NAIS. Call your Senators and ask that they support an amendment to strip the NAIS funding out of the bill! You can find your Senators’ contact information at www.congress.org or by calling the Capitol Switchboard at 202-224-3121.

From The Weston A. Price Foundation®

NAIS HEARING March 11 and COMMENTS BY March 16

USDA COMMENT PERIOD ENDS MARCH 16

In January, the USDA proposed a rule to require farms and other properties where animals are raised to be registered in the federal NAIS database for existing federal disease control programs. The rule also sets the stage for future mandatory animal identification. If you haven’t already submitted comments on this proposed rule, please be sure to do so before March 16! An easy way to comment online is through the Organic Consumers Association’s automated system, at http://salsa.democracyinaction.org/o/642/campaign.jsp?campaign_KEY=26665

Please be sure to personalize the letter! It can be as easy as a couple of sentences at the beginning stating who you are (for example, a farmer, consumer, property rights proponent) and why you care about NAIS.

CONGRESSIONAL HEARING ON NAIS, MARCH 11

The U.S. House Subcommittee on Livestock, Dairy and Poultry will hold a hearing on “animal identification programs” on Wednesday, March 11, 2009. This is the first time in several years that any Congressional Committee will hear testimony about NAIS! It is critical that the thousands of farmers and consumers who oppose NAIS make their voices heard in this process!

STEP 1: Before the Hearing:

At the end of the alert is a list of Subcommittee members. If one of the Subcommittee members is from your state, call that member. If your state does not have any representation on the Subcommittee, contact your own Representative and ask him or her to approach the Subcommittee to urge them to oppose NAIS. If you’re not sure who represents you, go to http://www.congress.org

When you call, ask to speak to the staffer who handles agricultural issues, and talk with them about your concerns about NAIS. Use a brief personal story to explain how NAIS would impact you. Emphasize that you want them to ask hard questions of both the industry and USDA representatives, and to make sure that people representing those who oppose NAIS are also heard at the hearing.

STEP 2: At the Hearing:

If you are in the DC area, please try to come to the hearing!

WHEN: Wednesday, March 11th – 10:00 a.m. WHERE: 1300 Longworth House Office Building (go to http://www.aoc.gov/cc/cobs/lhob.cfm for maps and parking information) WHAT: Subcommittee on Livestock, Dairy, and Poultry — Public hearing to review animal identification systems.

The subcommittee will hear invited testimony only, so you won’t be able to speak at the hearing. But it is still good for the subcommittee to know that a lot of people care enough about this issue to show up in person!

Immediately after the hearing, we encourage you to visit the Subcommittee members’ offices. Be polite and concise during your visit. Let them know that you were at the hearing because you are against NAIS. Briefly bring up one or two points that you felt weren’t covered at the hearing that show the problems with NAIS. Keep your visit short and thank them for their time.

STEP 3: After the Hearing:

You can submit written testimony to the subcommittee before the hearing, at the hearing, or up to 10 days after the hearing. Send your testimony to the Hearing Clerk, Jamie Mitchell, at Jamie.Mitchell@mail.house.gov Be sure to put “March 11 Hearing – Animal Identification Programs” in the subject line. Keep your comments clear, polite, and concise.

We will send out some guidance after the hearing for key points to make in your testimony, based on what is said at the hearing. If you are submitting comments before the hearing, you can draw ideas from the “Reasons to Stop NAIS” posted on the Farm-to-Consumer Legal Defense Fund’s site at http://www.ftcldf.org/nais.html (scroll down past the news items and lawsuit information) or from the comments submitted by FARFA on the USDA’s proposed rule for NAIS, posted at: http://farmandranchfreedom.org/content/files/090202_FARFA_Comments_USDA_rule.pdf

SUBCOMMITTEE MEMBERS:

Below are the Subcommittee members, their party and state, and phone numbers. You can also send an email by using this format: firstname.lastname@mail.house.gov We strongly recommend that you make at least your initial contact with the ag staffer with a telephone conversation.

Mike Rogers (R-AL), (p): 202-225-3261, (f): 202-226-8485
Dennis Cardoza (D-CA), (p): 202-225-6131, (f): 202-225-0819
Jim Costa (D-CA), (p): 202-225-3341, (f): 202-225-9308
Joe Baca (D-CA), (p): 202-225-6161, (f): 202-225-8671
Betsy Markey (D-CO), (p): 202-225-4676, (f): 202-225-5870
David Scott (Chair), (D-GA), (p): 202-225-2939, (f): 202-225-4628
Leonard Boswell (D-IA), (p): 202-225-3806, (f): 202-225-5608
Steve King (R-IA), (p): 202-225-4426, (f): 202-225-3193
Walt Minnick (D-ID), (p): 202-225-6611, (f): 202-225-3029
Frank Kratovil, Jr. (D-MD), (p): 202-225-5311, (f): 202-225-0254
Adrian Smith (R-NE), (p): 202-225-6435, (f): 202-225-0207
Tim Holden (D-PA), (p): 202-225-5546, (f): 202-226-0996
David P. Roe (R-TN), (p): 202-225-6356, (f): 202-225-5714
K. Michael Conaway (R-TX), (p): 202-225-3605 or 866-882-3811, (f): 202-225-1783
Randy Neugebauer, Ranking Minority Member (R-TX), (p): 202-225-4005 or 888-763-1611, (f): 202-225-9615
Bob Goodlatte (R-VA), (p): 202-225-5431, (f): 202-225-9681
Steve Kagen (D-WI), (p): 202-225-5665, (f): 202-225-5729

For more information about NAIS, go to www.FarmAndRanchFreedom.org

Rep. Peter DeFazio:
Website: www.defazio.house.gov

Washington, D.C. Office:
2134 Rayburn House Office Building,
District of Columbia 20515-3704
Phone: (202) 225-6416
Fax: (202) 225-0032

Eugene Office:
405 East 8th Avenue, #2030
Eugene, Oregon 97401
Phone: (541) 465-6732
Fax: (541) 465-6458

Azure Food Co-Op and Milk Group Info

PLANS: We usually do the Summer CSA thing but found we would love to have more control over some of the picking of what we receive especially as summer draws to an end and for the extended growing season – way to squash heavy for us. So i hope to eventually offer an option to the Summer CSA – buying what we want, still supporting local as much as possible, but buying in bulk from local suppliers or farms. There are a couple of wholesale suppliers in town that i have spoke with that we can only place large orders with, but we would get a much better deal on things like Virgin Coconut Oil, various nuts/nut butters, dried fruit, and raw honey. Another for organic produce, much of it local or at least West Coast only. I would have to place orders by the cases or gallons, with a minimum of $100. It will take sometime to build up and organize. I am hoping that come summer i can order cases (say a 12 heads/bunches of lettuce, or 20 lbs of carrots) and we can split it all up, paying wholesale prices. Please reply and let me know if you are interested in this so i can keep track and let you know when we have enough people to do it.

RAW MILK and EGGS: We still have room for others to join our milk and egg group. Milk is $6. a gallon and $3.25 a dozen for eggs. You must supply your own half or full gallon sterilized jars and lids and would need 3 times the amount you want each week, in jars. Ex: you want 4 half gallons each week, you need to have 12 jars and lids available at all times. 1 set with current milk, 1 set to send home with the next transporter, 1 set to leave at the farm to get filled. Each person commits to driving 1 day a week and we rotate through the names so just 1 person is picking up everyone in the groups order each week.

AZURE STANDARD: Here is the Azure info, the name and drop number, etc. If you need more info from me for setting up your Azure account please email me or call! I have selected both routes, which means that if we have enough in orders the stuff will ship every 2 weeks instead of once a month. Azure will not ship the order until the combined total from all of us reaches $550.

bethelfoods@gmail.com email for my co-op.
Host Name :Julia Serra
461-0442

Local Foods Store Opening in Sutherlin

Localvore Fresh Oregon Foods, LLC has rented the space between Sutherlin Drugs and Paw Prints Grooming on Central Avenue in Sutherlin. Owner Larisa Sparrowhawk says store inventory will be primarily from farms in Douglas and Lane Counties. To round out the inventory, allowing grains and drinks that are not produced locally, additional items will be purchased from the west coast in general.

Ms. Sparrowhawk is a foodie, which Cambridge Dictionary defines as “a person who loves food and is very interested in different types of food.” Although she has experimented since her teen years with various styles of eating, including macrobiotics, raw food and vegetarianism, she has settled into “a happy acceptance of myself as an omnivore who prefers local fresh food.” Her interest in food and nutrition intensified after she contracted food poisoning and lost her third pregnancy in 1995. Since then she has been a food and farm rights activist, lobbying state and US congressmen for laws that protect the farmers right to produce and sell food and the consumers right to purchase it. She is President of Oregon Consumers and Farmers Association and a member of the Weston A. Price Foundation and Virginia Independent Consumers and Farmers Association.

“The fact is, when cattle, swine and poultry are grown in confinement instead of on pasture, the likelihood of disease is huge. When a meat packing plant takes in 4,000 cattle a shift from four different countries and mixes hamburger in one huge vat, the chance of cross contamination is huge. When manufacturers are allowed to sell genetically engineered products to consumers without labeling, the consumer is at a far greater risk of having allergic reactions. It is much safer to buy your food from a local small farmer.” She smiled. “Besides, local food is fresher and tastes soooooo much better. I would eat local food for the taste, alone.”

Ms. Sparrowhawk moved to Oregon from Virginia in May of 2007 and immediately noted the lack of good grocery stores. She has been driving to Eugene every month to shop at Market of Choice, Capella’s, Trader Joes or Sundance Natural Foods. “It occurred to me that even in this economy, I am not the only one who is tired of wilted produce and factory farm meat.”

Localvore is still in the start up phase, but is moving quickly. “I just signed the lease. I meet with the lawyer next week. I joined Think Local Umpqua. I’ve been driving around the countryside tacking up flyers on the gates of farms that have clean looking operations.”

Localvore is still seeking member farms. Ms. Sparrowhawk says membership is $50 a year and entitles the farmer to a discount at the store as well as very favorable consignment terms. She expects to open the store around May 15th.

Contact: Larisa Sparrowhawk 541-537-0575
petaltothemetal@aol.com

Newsletter – February 2009

From the Editor:

I’m An Aunt!

[Photo: My nephew, Roman] Announcing the birth of my adorable little nephew.
~ Lisa


February Events:

Meeting & Potluck Dinner

Monday, February 9, 2008
6:00 to 8:00 PM

Location:
At the home of Megan Clark & Richard Grimaldi
2210 Floral Hill Drive, Eugene

Directions: THE BACK WAY FROM I-5 (Perfect for football game days, most direct route off I-5.) Take Glenwood EXIT 191 from I-5. From the south, go to the west end of the overpass and turn right on curvy Moon Mountain Drive. If you exit from the north, you will be on Moon Mountain Drive by going straight. Next, turn RIGHT on Laurel Hill Drive and go down the hill. At the bottom, turn LEFT on Augusta, across from a sign for an alley that says 18th. Pass the school for Northwest Youth Corps, and turn RIGHT on 26th for a block, then LEFT on Riverview for a block, turning RIGHT on Floral Hill Drive. Go .7 miles avoiding the potholes and look for 2210 on the LEFT. It is faded PINK with a weeping willow tree in the side yard. If you hit Hendricks Park, you’ve gone too far. Turn around and come back, it’s the 7th house on the right from Hendricks Park that you can see, light PINK with a carport and tall shrubs to the side.

FROM TOWN Go EAST on 19th past the University of Oregon campus. Follow signs directing you to Hendricks Park. When 19th ends at Fairmount Blvd., turn RIGHT. In one block, turn LEFT on Summit and go to the top of the hill where you can see the Hendricks Park Picnic Shelter. (Do not turn left on Birch.) Stay on Summit as it curves right, becoming Floral Hill Drive. (Do not turn right off it onto Fairmount Drive back through the woods.) In one block, when you exit the park where the houses are, Floral Hill Drive curves right at the yield sign. (Do not keep going downhill onto Sylvan.) Ours is the 7th house on the right that you can see, light PINK with a carport and tall shrubs to the side.

FROM I-5 NORTH EXIT 194-B THROUGH TOWN (Not for game days—bad traffic.) Take Eugene EXIT 194B off I-5.. You will be on 105 going WEST. Take EXIT 2, DOWNTOWN/UNIVERSITY OF OREGON. Cross the Ferry Street Bridge. Stay in the LEFT LANE, which directs you to the UO, instead of jumping off onto 8th St. You will be on a busy main street, which is first called E. Broadway, then Franklin Blvd. Pass the UO campus. Turn RIGHT a block past Market of Choice at WALNUT, following signs to Hendricks Park. In two blocks it will spit you out on Fairmount Blvd., where you get to turn RIGHT without stopping. Turn LEFT on Summit and go to the top of the hill where you can see the Hendricks Park Picnic Shelter. (Do not turn left on Birch.) STAY on Summit as it curves right, becoming FLORAL HILL DRIVE. (Do not turn right off it onto Fairmount Drive back through the woods.) In one block, when you exit the park where the houses are, Floral Hill Drive curves right at the yield sign. (Do not keep going downhill onto Sylvan.) Ours is the 7th house on the right that you can see, light PINK with a carport and tall shrubs to the side.

Phone: Megan’s number is 344-7604

Bring a Dish
Please bring a Nourishing Traditions style dish and join us for some great food and great conversation! Families and guests are welcome. Please bring enough food to feed the size of your party, and your recipe on a 3×5 card or notepaper (we are collecting these and will eventually compile a recipe book).

RSVP:
We appreciate an RSVP (info@krautpounder.com) if you think you will be attending so that we have a rough idea of how many people to expect, but feel free to just show up.

 

Monthly Potluck/Meetings:
Our potluck meetings are regularly scheduled on the second Monday of each month.

Host a Potluck:
The next potluck will be March 9, at Barb Shaw’s house. We still need volunteers to host potlucks on April 13, and May 11. Let us know if you would like to host an upcoming potluck.

New to all of this?
For those of you who are new to The Weston A. Price Foundation principals please see the Dietary Guidelines and Characteristics of Traditional Diets for a brief overview, and then get a copy of the book Nourishing Traditions for in-depth information and recipes.

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“The Popcorn Review”

“Iodine in Thyroid and Total Body Health”

by Dr. Janet R. Lang, BA, DC

Friday, February 20, 2008
7:30 to 9:00 PM

Location:
Market of Choice
67 West 29th, Eugene
Upstairs in the Community Room

This is the first of four presentations from the Wise Traditions Conference 2008 on the topic of Iodine and Thyroid Health. They were excellent, and we will be showing at least three of them this year.

“For decades iodine has been a misunderstood and clinically mismanaged trace mineral, resulting in a widespread severe deficiency in the current population. In recent years, research and advanced study of iodine has reached new heights. Optimal thyroid function requires sufficient iodine, but additionally a far greater whole body need for iodine has been rediscovered. Dr. Lang will bring together a summary of this important information and provide a comprehensive list of conditions that benefit from achieving iodine sufficiency which includes thyroid disease, chronic fatigue syndrome, depression, diabetes, heart disease, fibrocystic breast disease, breast cancer, all hormonally medicated cancers, chronic infections, and much more.”

Dr. Janet R. Lang, BA, DC, is a 1979 summa cum laude graduate of Palmer College of Chiropractic. She began studying Dr. Royal Lee’s whole food nutrition philosophy while a student at Palmer and has used Standard Process nutrition extensively in her practices. She is the author of Understanding the Peripheral Nervous System and a contributing author (along with others, including Bernie Siegel, MD, Norman Cousins and Prince Charles) of the book The Heart of the Healer.

Dr. Lang will be presenting seminars in Portland in March, and Seattle in May. Visit her website at drjlang.com.

We are requesting a $5-10 donation to the Eugene Chapter at the door.
Space is limited, so please contact us to reserve your seat.
Return to top of page


 

Other Sources and Information

As a Chapter Leader, I frequently receive emails from people and organizations that want me to pass some information on to you. I posted some in the December and January issues. Here are some more recent ones.

 

From The Weston A. Price Foundation®

IN-HOME VITAMIN D TEST

ZRT Laboratories now provides an inexpensive, in-home accurate test for vitamin D [25(OH)D]. Normally this test is $100-$200 and requires a doctor’s visit. The ZRT test can be done at home and costs $65 (or 4 for $55 each) at the link:

http://www.zrtlab.com/Page.aspx?nid=12&action=view&category=14&partner=VitaminD%20Council

You can order them through the lab directly, cost $135, by calling the company in Beaverton, Oregon at 1-866-600-1636.

The test involves collecting a few drops of blood after a finger prick and sending the blotter paper back to ZRT in the postage-paid envelope provided with the kit. Your results will be sent to you by mail in about a week.

We’d like as many members as possible to participate in some research on vitamin D, which we will be able to use in our upcoming article on cod liver oil. Please take the ZRT test and send us the results along with the brand and amount of cod liver oil you are taking, as well as any other vitamin D supplements. Please let us know how long you have been taking these products. We’d like to compile this information by early February. (We’ll keep your details confidential, of course.) This is the perfect time to do this research since few of us are spending much time in the sun right now.

From The Weston A. Price Foundation®

GOODSEARCH.COM

The Weston A. Price Foundation has begun to receive funds earned when our members use goodsearch.com rather than the more popular search engines. WAPF receives about 1.3 cents per search on the Yahoo-powered search engine and about three percent of purchases made through their online retail partners, from Amazon to Zappos.

You can help support the Foundation with every internet search or purchase. Just go to goodsearch.com to register and select your charity, and then use the search engine for your internet searches and purchases.

I’ve been using goodsearch.com since I heard about it. The only trouble I’ve had is a couple of times it was too busy to complete my search for a while. It is really easy. I’ve made it my homepage.

From The Weston A. Price Foundation®

HR 778 REPEAL INTERSTATE RAW MILK BAN

Dear Members,

We are pleased to announce that Congressman Ron Paul has introduced a bill (HR 778) that would repeal the current ban on raw milk and raw milk products for human consumption in interstate commerce. The ban has made it more difficult for consumers to access raw milk and has hurt the ability of raw milk producers to make a living.

Passage of the bill into law would go a long way to stopping the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) in its efforts to completely shut down the supply of raw milk.

To be successful, HR 778 must have co-sponsors. Your help is needed. Now is the time to mobilize consumers and farmers across the U.S.

For more information see The Farm To Consumer Legal Defense Fund: www.ftcldf.org/news/news-01feb2009.htm

The Weston A. Price Foundation sent out an announcement to all members about HR 778, with a lot of information about the bill, including a list of Committee Members to contact. But for the sake of space I am not going to reprint the whole thing here. Please contact www.farmtoconsumer.org for more information.

BioCento Ecofarms in Yakima

Hi Lisa,

I represent a local Yakima farm, BioCento Ecofarms. We sell certified organic eggs, as well as organic chickens, rabbits (whole, frozen) and organic goats. Last year we were selling eggs in Seattle to an affiliated chapter. In addition, our chickens are fed flax seed so the eggs are high in Omega 3 fatty acids… they are really delicious eggs!

We do have eggs starting to become available, and wondered if your club might be interested. Depending on volume, cost would be between $5 and $6 a dozen. There may be an extra fee (maybe $25?) for delivery. I am hoping to use college students or regular commuters, and to give them gas money. Or you may know Yakima produce suppliers that are already supplying your club. We are able to deliver fairly large quantities on a weekly basis.

Please call me if I can answer any questions for you; it may take a little figuring to work out the delivery, but we would love to help put it together if your club is interested in buying organic eggs. (These are large eggs with the lovely bright orange yolks!)

Best wishes,

Mary

Mary Baechler
http://biocento.com/
509-307-5082

SlowFood Eugene

Annual Membership Meeting And Potluck Dinner–February 22, 6:00 pm, Eugene Garden Club

It’s time to get started on Slow Food Eugene 2009. There’s lots of work to be done. In 2009, Slow Food USA will take a much more active role in food politics. We hope to follow suit and become local leaders advocating for a better world though the food that we eat.

The tough economic times make it imperative that we redouble our efforts to support local farmers, ranchers, and fishermen producing those high quality vegetables, fruits, meats, and eggs that we have come to enjoy.

The first step will be our membership meeting. We will elect a slate of officers, review changes to our by-laws, and plan events for the year. If you are interested in joining the membership team or have ideas for events, please send us an email.

Remember, there is strength in numbers. Bring friends who are interested in joining Slow Food Eugene or who just want to find out what this “Slow” thing is all about.

For the potluck, bring a dish to share and a beverage. Also, bring your own dishes, flatware, and drinking cups.

The Details:

DATE: Sunday, February 22, 2009
TIME: 6:00 pm
PLACE: Eugene Garden Club, 1645 High Street, Eugene

Parking is available across the street at the Planned Parenthood office building

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Newsletter – January 2009

From the Editor:

Local Resources Around Eugene

At our December potluck the topic of where to find certain food items came up, and people shared some good suggestions. I don’t remember many of them anymore (this is why I need a volunteer to take notes at the meetings), but I would like to start a local sources list.

In addition to the Lane County Farmers’ Market, local farms, and our wonderful selection of natural food stores in Eugene, below are a few local stores that I have found to be particularly useful for finding specific foods.

Grass-fed beef, organ meats and bones:

Long’s Meat Market
81 E. 28th Ave.
Eugene, OR
phone: (541) 344-3172
email: info@longsmeatmarket.com
www.longsmeatmarket.com

Local beef, organ meats, dog food and bones: (pasture & grain-fed – no feed-lots)

Bright Oaks Meats
660 Main Street
Springfield, OR
phone: (541) 726-6913

Grass-fed beef, pasture-raised pork and poultry:

Deck Family Farm
25362 High Pass Rd.
Junction City, OR 97448
phone: 541/998-4697
email: info@deckfamilyfarm.com
www.deckfamilyfarm.com

Wild-caught fish, seafood and fish roe:

Fisherman’s Market
830 W 7th Ave.
Eugene, OR
phone: (541) 484-2722
www.plankfish.com

Carp roe caviar: (without dyes or preservatives)

Pomegranates Catering & Classes
2833 Willamette Street
Eugene, OR 97405
phone: (541) 242-0705

www.pomegranatesmmg.com
Update: I just learned that Pomegranates retail location is no longer open.
Pomegranates is now focusing on catering and classes.
New phone: (541) 543-4121.
Email: pomegranates@comcast.net
(Darn! I am almost out of my caviar!)

Raw nuts and coconut oil:

Hummingbird Wholesale
254 Lincoln S.
Eugene, OR
phone: (541) 686- 0921
fax: (541) 686-6168
www.hummingbirdwholesale.com

Coconut oil, organic herbs

Mountain Rose Herbs
Pleasant Hill, OR
phone: (800) 879-3337
www.mountainroseherbs.com
(For local pick-up – place order by phone, then give 24 hours before pick-up.)

This is just the beginning of a list to get you thinking about it, so please send me your suggestions.

In December, I also received my “Shopping Guide 2009” from The Weston A. Price Foundation. WAPF sends out this little booklet to all members each year. It provides “recommended brand names and helps you make wise decisions in the grocery store.”

If you know of local sources for items listed in this booklet, or other products that should be listed in it, please send them to me. I am really disappointed that the little Russian market in West Eugene closed, because I have not been able to find another local store that carries smoked cod liver. Believe it or not, it was really tasty!

~ Lisa

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January Events:

Meeting & Potluck Dinner

Monday, January 12, 2008
6:00 to 8:00 PM

Location:
At the home of Ellen Singer
1025 Elkay Dr., Eugene

Directions: From the north:

Take River Road exit from Beltline left/south onto River Road. Go about a mile and a half, pass traffic lights at Horn Lane and Hilliard. Turn right onto Elkay Drive, just in front of “River Road Medical Group”.

From the south:

Take Chambers Street north until it turns into River Road. Turn left onto Elkay Drive (you’ll see River Rd. Medical Group on the left).

Once on Elkay Drive:

1025 Elkay Drive is about 1/2 mile from River Road. Look for the big wooden fence with big black wrought iron gate. Park parallel to the fence in the grassy area outside the gate, not in the driveway. Come in through the gate (which may be hard to open), up the brick steps (watch out, they can be slippery when wet).

Phone: Ellen’s number is 689-3968

Bring a Dish
Please bring a Nourishing Traditions style dish and join us for some great food and great conversation! Families and guests are welcome. Please bring enough food to feed the size of your party, and your recipe on a 3×5 card or notepaper (we are collecting these and will eventually compile a recipe book).

RSVP:
We appreciate an RSVP (info@krautpounder.com) if you think you will be attending so that we have a rough idea of how many people to expect, but feel free to just show up.

 

Monthly Potluck/Meetings:
Our potluck meetings are regularly scheduled on the second Monday of each month.

Host a Potluck:
We also need a volunteer to host the potluck on February 9th. Let us know if you would like to host an upcoming potluck.

New to all of this?
For those of you who are new to The Weston A. Price Foundation principals please see the Dietary Guidelines and Characteristics of Traditional Diets for a brief overview, and then get a copy of the book Nourishing Traditions for in-depth information and recipes.

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“The Popcorn Review”

“Immunity, Vaccinations and Infectious Disease in Children”

by Phillip Incao, MD

Friday, January 23, 2008
7:30 to 9:00 PM

Location:
Market of Choice
67 West 29th, Eugene
Upstairs in the Community Room

This was scheduled for December, but it was cancelled due to weather conditions. We are offering it again this month.

Dr. Philip Incao has had an active general practice of anthroposophic medicine since 1973, mostly in rural upstate New York, more recently in Denver, Colorado. He was featured in the July-August, 2003 Mothering magazine article, “The Healing Crisis: Don’t Worry Mom-I’m Just Growing!”

Dr. Incao’s special interest is strengthening the health of children against the increasing spirit-weakening influences of modern life, especially in education and healthcare. He lectures in Waldorf communities nationwide on the practical applications of a spiritual yet scientific understanding of the human being to healing and to education. He is also a member of the advisory boards of Alive and Well AIDS Information Network in Los Angeles, the National Vaccine Information Center in Virginia, and the Foundation for Health Choice in Washington, D.C.

Dr. Incao writes a regular medical column “The Doctor Speaks” for the quarterly magazine of healthy living, Lilipoh.

Three of Dr. Incao’s essays on children’s health are included in the book The Vaccination Dilemma, edited by Christine Murphy and published by Lantern Books, also available from Steiner Books. He is also the father of three grown sons.

Articles by Philip Incao, MD:

We are requesting a $5-10 donation to the Eugene Chapter at the door.
Space is limited, so please contact us to reserve your seat.
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Library Books

At the Eugene Public Library

A local member and I were discussing the book Gut and Psychology Syndrome by Natasha Campbell-McBride, and the idea of a Eugene Chapter lending library. At present we do not have the resources to make this happen, but we do have a wonderful local resource, the Eugene Public Library. So I decided to compare the Thumbs Up Reviews on the Weston A. Price website, with the books available locally at the Eugene Public Library.

The most glaring omission in the library’s collection is the classic book (written by the name-sake of our organization): Nutrition and Physical Degeneration by Weston A. Price, DDS.

The library welcomes suggestions, and has made several book purchases after my requests, so please take a moment to suggest a purchase for one or more of these items. You do not need to have a library card. You may Suggest a Purchase online, or fill out a request in person at the library.

The library will also make inter-library loans on your behalf. For example I read Pottenger’s Cats: A Study in Nutrition this way.

Not Available at the Eugene Public Library:

These books and videos are not currently available at the Eugene Public Library. Read reviews at Thumbs Up Reviews, and then Suggest a Purchase to the library.

    • Cancer Cause and Cure
      by Percy Weston

 

    • Diet Cure, The
      by Julia Ross, MA
      (formerly available, now lost)

 

    • Dying to Look Good
      by Christine Hoza Farlow, DC

 

    • Farms of Tomorrow Revisited
      by Trauger Groh and Steven McFadden

 

    • Fiber Menace
      By Konstantin Monastyrsky

 

 

    • Food Enzymes for Health and Longevity
      by Edward Howell, MD

 

    • Gut and Psychology Syndrome, The
      by Natasha Campbell-McBride, MD

 

    • Grassfed Gourmet, The
      by Shannon Hayes

 

    • High Blood Pressure Hoax, The
      by Sherry A. Rogers, MD

 

    • Keeping a Family Cow
      by Joann S. Grohman

 

    • A Life Unburdened: Getting Over Weight and Getting On with My Life
      by Richard Morris

 

    • Milk Book, The
      by William Campbell Douglass, MD

 

    • Milk, Money, and Madness
      by Naomi Baumslag, MD, MPH and Dia L. Michels

 

    • No-Grain Diet, The
      by Dr. Joseph Mercola

 

    • Nutrition and Physical Degeneration
      by Weston A. Price, DDS

 

    • Nutrition in Biblical Times
      by Ruth F. Rosevear

 

    • Recipes for Life
      by Becky Mauldin

 

    • Soil, Grass and Cancer
      by Andre Voisin

 

    • Sweet Misery
      DVD produced by Sound and Fury Productions

 

    • Ten Days to Optimal Health
      by Kristina Amelong, CNC, CT

 

    • Traditional Foods Are Your Best Medicine
      by Ron Schmid

 

    • Urga (Close to Eden)
      Nikita Mikhalkov
      Miramax, 1991 (DVD & VHS)

 

  • Whole Beast, The
    by Fergus Henderson

The good news is that our local library does carry many of the books recommended by the Weston A. Price Foundation, including the Wise Traditions Journal and Nourishing Traditions.

If you haven’t read these books I highly recommend you check them out. Some of my favorites are: Nourishing Traditions (although I think everyone should own their own copy), back issues of Wise Traditions journals, Good Calories Bad Calories, The Cholesterol Myths, Eat Fat Lose Fat, Enzyme Nutrition, Real Food, The Untold Story of Milk, and Wild Fermentation.

Available at the Eugene Public Library:

(Reviews are available at Thumbs Up Reviews and in back issues of the Wise Traditions Journal):

 

 

    • Cholesterol Myths, The: exposing the fallacy that cholesterol and saturated fat cause heart disease
      by Uffe Ravnskov, MD, PhD

 

 

 

    • Eat Fat, Lose Fat: lose weight and feel great with three delicious, science-based coconut diets
      by Mary Enig, PhD

 

    • Eat Here: reclaiming homegrown pleasures in a global supermarket
      by Halweil, Brian.

 

 

 

 

 

    • Fourfold Path to Healing, The : working with the laws of nutrition, therapeutics, movement and meditation in the art of medicine
      by Cowan, Thomas S.

 

 

 

    • Know Your Fats: The Complete Primer for Understanding the Nutrition of Fats, Oils, and Cholesterol
      by Mary Enig, PhD

 

 

 

    • Nourishing Traditions : the cookbook that challenges politically correct nutrition and the diet dictocrats
      by Sally Fallon

 

 

 

 

 

    • Seeds of Deception: Exposing Industry and Government Lies About the Safety of the Genetically Engineered Foods You’re Eating
      by Jeffrey Smith

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Happy reading!
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Other Sources and Information

As a Chapter Leader, I frequently receive emails from people and organizations that want me to pass some information on to you. I posted some in last month’s issue, and had positive responses, so I will continue to pass on this information.

 

This one should have gone out last month. I remembered getting the email, but I had filed it away so carefully that I couldn’t find it!

Economical, Nutritious,
and Delicious Meals Using Natural Foods

Dear Lisa,

As a fellow member of the Weston A. Price Foundation, I share your interest in using nutrient-dense natural foods to promote health and well-being. I am a Natural Foods Educator who has been teaching people to eat well and improve their health for over ten years. To make it easier for people to transition to more of a Nourishing Traditions diet, and to keep people from getting into a meal-time rut once they get there, I created Dinner with Jennette, an online meal planning service.

As a WAPF leader, you know how important it is to get people cooking. If you are interested in a resource for preparing economical, quick, and easy nutrient-dense meals that you can share with your members, please stop by my Dinner With Jennette information table at the 2008 Weston A. Price Wise Traditions conference November 8-9. All attendees who subscribe during the conference will receive a bonus gift.

Would you please pass on the following announcement to the members of your WAPF chapter? If you have any questions or comments, please contact me at jennette@jennette-turner.com , I’d be delighted to talk with you.

Thank you,

Jennette
Economical, Nutritious, and Delicious Meals Using Natural Foods
Minneapolis-based natural foods educator Jennette Turner enables you to easily and quickly prepare nutrient-dense meals with natural foods on a regular basis. Dinner with Jennette – Meal Plans for Naturally Healthy Eating (www.dinnerwithjennette.com) offers subscriptions for 12 months of nutritionally-balanced, seasonal meal plans, complete with recipes, nutrition information, and shopping lists.

Dinner with Jennette’s passionate subscribers cite how the service has trimmed their grocery bills because they waste less food, don’t buy expensive processed foods, and eat at home more often. Turner has heard how customers appreciate organized meal planning, new ways to get healthful food on the table, and the convenience of ready-made shopping lists. And Weston Price members always appreciate her new ideas for organ meats!

Each month, Dinner with Jennette subscribers download 12 meal plans containing recipes developed for their variety, flavor and nutritional value – all using natural foods, nothing processed or refined. Created for families, singles, and even for company, the meals are also suitable for gluten-free diets, and can be adapted for casein-free diets. One-year subscriptions are available for only $5.00/month.

Nutritiously Balanced Meals for All Seasons
Turner uses the changing seasons as her inspiration for each month’s meal plans. In the fall such dishes as “Argentinean Pot Roast” and “Apple Parsnip Soup” may be on the menu. During the winter months, Turner creates new ways to use holiday meal leftovers, such as the one-dish-wonder “Turkey Dijon Stew with Potatoes and Kale.” When summer rolls around, it’s likely that “Grilled Mojito Pork Chops” or “Sunny Summer Squash Soup” would be on the list. Also included in her monthly offerings are recipes for The Basics, such as “How to make the perfect chicken stock (and why homemade is so nourishing),” and Bonus Recipes such as “Mini Strawberry Custard Cakes.”

Great Customer Feedback
Turner encourages feedback from her customers and has enhanced Dinner with Jennette with such additions as casein-free options, meals for entertaining (now known as “Company Meals”), and healthy kid-friendly treats (cheesy crackers and caramel corn). Her simple, yet creative, recipes incorporate a variety of familiar and new flavors with traditional American, Mexican, French, Indian and Asian dishes, most of which can be prepared in 30 – 45 minutes or less.

Subscription Purchase Information
A subscription to Dinner with Jennette (www.jennette-turner.com) offers 12 balanced meals each month for one year. The $5.00/month fee provides a total of 144 meal plans each year with recipes, nutrition information and shopping lists, accessed and downloaded from her web site.

Subscribers can access their meal plans from previous months at any time on the web site. This enables families to easily enjoy their favorite meals again. In just a few months, subscribers have enough meal plans to eliminate the old question of, “What’s for dinner?”

 

Newsletter – December 2008

From the Editor:

My great-aunt died this week. She was born in 1911, and died at 97-1/2 years old. She was the last of my grandfather’s family. While I didn’t know her well, I feel a great loss of connection to my family’s past and the opportunity to learn more from her.

From talking with her daughter I learned that my great-aunt always had a large garden, growing corn, beets, beans and potatoes. She grew up with a dairy cow. They raised their own chickens and pigs, and hunted wild game. She ate raw butter, cream and milk. She cooked her fried chicken in homemade lard every Sunday. She was brought up on cod liver oil, and gave it to her children every winter, without regard to whether they liked it or not.

She was always trim and active, without ever dieting. She had a wonderful smile, and had a sharp mind right until the end. She took up oil painting at the age of 80 (and was quite good at it).

She had a bad fall at the age of 91 and was covered in bruises, but didn’t break a single bone. She drank full-fat milk until her doctor took her off of it at 95 (that’s probably what did her in).

Here is yet another example that Dr. Price was right. The people who are currently living into their 80s, 90s and beyond, were not brought up on the low-fat USDA-approved food pyramid. They ate real food with plenty of saturated fat and fat-soluble vitamins.

If you have any friends or relatives who were born in the early part of the 20th century, ask them what kind of foods they ate in their childhood. Send me their responses. I would love to hear what they have to share, and will post them in a future newsletter.

~ Lisa


December Events:

Meeting & Potluck Dinner

Monday, December 8, 2008
6:00 to 8:00 PM

Location:
At the home of Gina Aramburu
7273 Holly Street, Springfield

Directions: Head east on Main Street in Springfield, and then take a right at 72nd. Go almost all the way to the top of the hill and turn left on Holly (last left turn). House has wood shingles and green trim, and there’s a piece of green stained glass in the window above the garage. Park anywhere on the street.

Phone: 360-393-2431

Please bring a Nourishing Traditions style dish and join us for some great food and great conversation! Families and guests are welcome. Please bring enough food to feed the size of your party and your recipe on a 3×5 card or notepaper.

We appreciate an RSVP if you think you will be attending so that we have a rough idea of how many people to expect, but feel free to just show up.

 

Our potluck meetings are regularly scheduled on the second Monday of each month.

We need volunteers to host the next few potlucks. Let us know if you would like to host one. I would also like one volunteer each meeting who is willing to take notes and email them to me. Contact me for details.

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“The Popcorn Review”

“Immunity, Vaccinations and Infectious Disease in Children”

by Phillip Incao, MD

Friday, December 19, 2008
7:30 to 9:00 PM

Location:
Market of Choice
67 West 29th, Eugene
Upstairs in the Community Room

Philip Incao has had an active general practice of anthroposophic medicine since 1973, mostly in rural upstate New York, more recently in Denver, Colorado. He was featured in the July-August, 2003 Mothering magazine article, “The Healing Crisis: Don’t Worry Mom-I’m Just Growing!”

Dr. Incao’s special interest is strengthening the health of children against the increasing spirit-weakening influences of modern life, especially in education and healthcare. He lectures in Waldorf communities nationwide on the practical applications of a spiritual yet scientific understanding of the human being to healing and to education. He is also a member of the advisory boards of Alive and Well AIDS Information Network in Los Angeles, the National Vaccine Information Center in Virginia, and the Foundation for Health Choice in Washington, D.C.

Dr. Incao writes a regular medical column “The Doctor Speaks” for the quarterly magazine of healthy living Lilipoh.

Three of Dr. Incao’s essays on children’s health are included in the book The Vaccination Dilemma, edited by Christine Murphy and published by Lantern Books, also available from Steiner Books. He is also the father of three grown sons.

Articles by Philip Incao, MD:

 

We are requesting a $5-10 donation to the Eugene Chapter at the door.
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Get Involved

The Eugene Chapter is a Volunteer-Run Organization

I’d like to talk for a moment about volunteering and share some of my personal experience. I started organizing Weston A. Price gatherings in Eugene because I wanted to meet other people who eat this way, and because I wanted my (at that time not yet born) son to grow up knowing that this is the normal, healthy way to eat. I continue to volunteer my time to the Eugene Chapter because I enjoy it and I still have the same goals for the health of my family. My point here is that I don’t do this solely for altruistic reasons; to a large extent my reasons are personal (and you might even say selfish).

I would like you to consider for a moment what you would like to see available in Eugene. What are your goals? What do you get out of the Eugene Chapter? What would you like to see offered? Would you like to attend food preparation classes? Do you want to change the word, change laws, change school lunch policies, put an end to GMOs or see raw milk available in stores? Would you like to see the creation of Eugene Chapter recipe book? Do you want to improve your own health? Or do you want to make the world a better place for your children and grandchildren?

Then think for a moment about what you can put into those goals. Are you so filled with information about nutrition that you are practically bursting at the seams to share it? Or are you so new to this that you feel overwhelmed? Do you have time to volunteer an hour once a year, once a month, once a week? Do you have space available to host a potluck? Do you have skills in writing, organizing, bookkeeping, or layout design? Can you make phone calls, post flyers, or take notes?

We have room in this organization for all types of skills and involvement level.

Here are a few things that I have thought of:

  • Host a potluck
  • Take notes at meetings
  • Phone call people without email
  • Help write Kraut Pounder care instructions
  • Help write the Newsletter
  • Assist with webpage design and/or updates
  • Bookkeeping using QuickBooks
  • Respond to emails
  • Pack and ship Kraut Pounders
  • Organization
  • Plan food preparation classes
  • And more… If you have other ideas just let us know.

If you want to volunteer in order to help me out, that is great. If you want to volunteer in order to help the community, wonderful. But If you want to volunteer in order to further your own goals, I think that is where our real strength comes from. The future of the Eugene Chapter is literally shaped by those who put energy into it.

I must say however, if you are one of those people who’s life is so busy that you don’t have time or energy to add a single thing, don’t feel bad about not doing more. Taking care of yourself, and feeding yourself and your family nutrient-dense food has to come first. Because when it comes right down to it that is what The Weston A. Price Foundation is all about.
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Sources and Other Information

As a Chapter Leader I frequently receive emails from people and organizations that want me to pass some information on to you, our members. This month I am posting some of these I have received this year. The first listing is from a local WAP member with a space for rent, other information includes local source for products, and resources available from around the country.

Suite For Rent

Private, spacious 1 bedroom suite in updated S.W. Hills home $575 + utilities

This is a great space w/ shared kitchen and laundry room (w/ sink). We eat from the Weston A. Price diet, Nourishing Traditions cookbook. I would LOVE to have a renter w/ similar interests and diet.

The space is a completely separate unfurnished living area: a 15’ x 12’ bedroom, bath, and a 27’ x 27’ great room with your own entry and private patio. Lots of built-in storage, natural light and windows overlooking a large yard where deer, turkeys, and squirrels come to visit. Wi-fi access. Close to bus line. Covered off street parking. The shared kitchen and laundry is separated by a door.

I am looking for a quiet, responsible, honest person that manifests intentions that benefit the entire household. No smoking, no drugs, no pets.

I am a professional woman with two young children and work from home. I love life and am easy to get along with.

Rent is $575/month plus 1/3 household utilities. (include electric, water, sewer, garbage).

For further information and an application call: Teri-Sue at 520-4011.

South Chambers west off Mclean.

Sundance Natural Foods

Dear Eugene Chapter,

just thought some of your members might be interested to know that we (Sudance Natural Foods) have started carrying products from Dr. Rons and Green Pastures. We now have:

-Blue Ice high vitamin cod liver oil ($18.95)
-Fermented cod liver oil ($36.25)
-High vitamin butter oil ($88.95), yea it’s expensive
-High vitamin cod liver oil/high vitamin butter oil mix ($37.75)
and a few more things.

From Dr. Rons we have grassfed, freerange, freezed-dried organ capsules:

-Adrenal ($49.75)
-Liver ($23.25)
-Thymus ($59.75)
-Mix ($49.95)
other products include;
-Multi Plus ($41.50)
-Iodine Complex ($38.50)
-Cal-Mag Plus ($30.50)

As far as we know we are the only store in town carrying these items. We also can special order any other products someone may want from these retailers. For anyone ordering 6 or more of a single product we pass on a 10% discount, or our senior discount (62 or older) is also 10%.

If anyone has questions you can give us a call at 541-343-9142, ask for the vitamins department. We are located at the corner of 24th and Hilyard in SouthEast Eugene.

Sincerely,

The Sundance vitamins department

Zukay Live Foods

Greetings!

My name is Scott, and I’m the founder of a new natural food company, Zukay Live Foods, that my wife and I started based on the teachings of Weston A. Price. We make raw and lacto-fermented salsas and relishes here outside of Lancaster, PA, and our mission with the company is to bring the health benefits of lacto-fermented foods back into the American diet through foods that Americans already consume. We’re not looking to change people’s taste buds – we just want to give them tremendously healthier choices through the foods they are used to eating.

Anyway, we were at the Wise Traditions Conference this past week in San Francisco, and we were absolutely energized by all the wonderful feedback we got on the products. This feedback inspired me to write you to tell you about the products. As a long-time member myself, I know the joy of finding a new product that allows me to live easier to the basic principles Sally teaches. I know how thrilled I was even just this week to find sources of beef tallow and pemmican bars (www.grasslandbeef.com), salmon eggs (www.vitalchoice.com), and butter oil (www.greenpasture.org). It was in that vein of discovery and helping that we launched the company, and why I write you.

Since you are a Chapter Leader, I was hoping to reach out to you and your chapter members and let you know about our products. We have distribution in natural food stores and Whole Foods all throughout the Northeast (Maine to Virginia, west to Michigan), and we will be getting distribution in Northern California within the next 2 months. We’re not currently in distribution anywhere else, but all our products (Mild and Hot Salsa, Garlic Dill and Horseradish Dill Relishes) are available on-line (www.zukaylive.com) in all 48 contiguous states.

In the spirit of discovery, if you could forward this on to your members, I would be very appreciative. If you are personally interested, we can discuss samples for upcoming potlucks you may hold, and I can also provide you with some flyers if you are interested as well. Our website is www.zukaylive.com if you’d like to check us out first. I can also be contacted as below; the 443-655-7074 number is the best way to get a hold of me.

I thank you very much for your time, as I know this e-mail came to you unsolicited. You won’t be bombarded with e-mails from us, but I do hope our products interest you and that we can work together to help make nutrient-dense living an easier thing in our busy world.

Sincerely,

Scott

Scott Grzybek
CEO and Founder
ZUKAY Live Foods LLC
PO Box 514
Elverson, PA 19520
(610) 286-3077
(443) 655-7074
www.zukaylive.com

Eat Live Everyday.

The Disappearing Male

The Disappearing Male is a 45 min video shown by the BBC of Canada. The information has been successfully hidden for over 50 years by the Chemical Industry Council (Monsanto and others) to maintain their profits and our demise. The part I don’t understand is: are they and their children and grandchildren not part of this global exposure. Did they think their babies were immune to the DNA and cellular structure damage of toxic exposure. The facts are well presented and I hope you take the time not only to educate yourself, but to send this link on to every one everywhere. We need to expose the truth in order that we may change the lives of our future generations.

In all seriousness,
vee

www.informationliberation.com/?id=26130

Sprouted Grain

Hello Weston A. Price Chapter leader!

If your chapter members are interested in SPROUTED FLOURS, Soaked and Dried “Crispy” nuts and seeds, Soaked Oatmeal Granola and more healthy eating options “the Weston A. Price way”, then JoshEWEa’s Garden, LLC might be your answer!

Located in Ashippun, Wisconsin, JoshEWEa’s Garden, LLC is a licensed producer of Sprouted Wheat Flour, and Soaked and Dried nuts, seeds and cereals. The food products you love and need are only a phone call away!

THREE WAYS TO BUY: Healthy Food Stores and Family Farms resell our products here in Wisconsin, become a distributor today… OR you can setup a buying group and arrange for a once-a-month delivery for YOUR chapter members… OR Order direct online at www.joshEWEasgarden.com!

Call us today to discuss ordering direct or to find an outlet for the JoshEWEa’s Garden product line nearest to YOU! Natural Goodness from our home to YOURS!

Michaeleen Hinca
JoshEWEa’s Garden, LLC
Ashippun, Wisconsin
262-468-4400

Michaeleen Hinca
JoshEWEa’s Garden, LLC
262-468-4400
info@JoshEWEasGarden.com

Gluten Free Cookbook

Dear Chapter Leader,

My new Cookbook is a great resource for preparing nutrient-dense meals that are also gluten free. Would you be willing to pass on the following announcement to the members of your WAPF chapter? If you have any questions or comments, please contact me.

Thanks and all the best,

Priscilla Smith
WAPF Anne Arundel County Chapter co-Leader
My New Gluten Free Cookbook is now available in PDF Format! Living, Loving, and Cooking With My Daughter, The Cookbook that explores the Art of Creating Nutrient-Dense Gluten-Free Foods by Priscilla Smith I decided to compile my traditionally prepared gluten-free recipes in a book after many requests from friends and family. More than a cookbook, these pages document my relationship with my daughter Jetta and my journey as a Mother. I hope other Mothers find this book helpful in creating easy and nourishing meals for their children. You can buy it now by going to:

www.nourishingyouandyourchildren.blogspot.com

Raw Milk Production Handbook

NOW AVAILABLE! RAW MILK PRODUCTION HANDBOOK by Tim Wightman and co-produced by the Farm-to-Consumer Legal Defense Fund and the Weston A. Price Foundation.

This 52 page handbook will soon be a classic among raw milk farmers and consumers alike. An easy, informative and interesting read, it covers the wide range of essentials to safe raw milk production, including –

* Basics of Dairy Cows
* The Basics of Pasture Feeding – including The Great Grain Debate
* The Basics of Milking
* Storage and Handling
* Milk Testing and Sample Taking (including a section “On-Farm Testing” contributed by Mark McAfee of Organic Pastures Dairy)
* Summary of Safety Regime for a Small Farm
* Bovine Diseases (causes and controls)

The author, Tim Wightman, is a farmer, consultant and one of the first cow-share operators in the USA. He is also a founding board member of the Farm-to-Consumer Legal Defense Fund.

Who should buy a copy?

– New-to-farming families – for the basics including how to purchase, care for and milk your cow.
– Farmers with experience – for the sections and charts on testing and bovine diseases. Handy to give out to those you consult with, too.
– Farmers converting from commercial milk production – for the things to consider in the shift to non-toxic and raw.
– Consumers – for the general understanding that can improve and inform your buying decisions.

While thorough, it’s not highly technical. We recommend it for raw milk farmers and consumers of all ages.

Price is $6.00 (including shipping and handling to USA addresses)

Purchase Online – www.ptfassociates.com/secure/ftcldf/ftcf_store.htm

Purchase by Mail – Send a check (payable to FTCLDF) to FTCLDF – Raw Milk Handbook, 8116 Arlington Blvd., Suite 263, Falls Church, VA 22042.

Purchase by Phone (credit card required) – 703-208-3276 (10 a.m. – 6:00 p.m. EST)

Taaron Meikle
Farm-to-Consumer Legal Defense Fund
8116 Arlington Blvd., #263
Falls Church, VA 22042
703-208-FARM (3276)
www.farmtoconsumer.org

Let me know if you would like to see more of this type of information in future newsletters.

Newsletter – November 2008

From the Editor:

Giving Thanks

Maybe I’ve been a “foodie” my whole life. While as a child I am sure I would have told you that Christmas and my Birthday were my favorite holidays, I’ve always had a fondness for Thanksgiving. Now, as an adult, I have a deeper appreciation for the holiday. When else does our culture value traditional foods, preparing and eating a meal with loved ones, and giving thanks for the bounty from the Earth?

Even during my years of vegetarianism I made special foods for the occasion. I thought my roast “tofu-beast” tasted OK at the time, but is not something I would recommend anymore. Now I realize that traditional foods are wonderfully tasty and naturally filling. Thanksgiving is the one meal each year when you could serve a meal cooked entirely from Nourishing Traditions to any junk-food-junky and they would not think it was out of place.

Forget about the sugary store-bought cranberry sauce, marshmallows, and commercial pie. Roast a turkey stuffed with whole grain bread crumbs, vegetables, nuts or even fruit, roast squash and other vegetables, make a simple cranberry relish and pumpkin pie using natural sweeteners, share the meal with your loved ones, and cultivate an attitude of appreciation and thanks. Now there is a recipe for a wonderful holiday!

Enjoy!

~ Lisa

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November Events:

Wise Traditions 2008 Conference

The Wise Traditions 2008 conference is this month, and is the first West Coast conference!

Dates:
Friday, November 7 to Sunday, November 9, 2008
(with additional special events on Monday, November 10th)

Location:
Hyatt San Francisco Airport,
1333 Bayshore Highway
Burlingame, California 94010
(650) 347-1234
www.sanfranciscoairport.hyatt.com

Full Conference Registration for WAPF members is $400. Full Conference Registration for Student or Senior WAPF Members is $300. Register online here, or at the door.

We still have space available in my minivan for additional drivers/riders. We are planning to leave from Eugene Wednesday night, and return home Monday after the last of the events.. We may also still have room for one more person in the hotel room. Let me know if you are interested in carpooling or sharing a room.

More details about the conference can be found at: www.westonaprice.org/conference/2008/index.html

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Meeting & Potluck Dinner

Monday, November 17, 2008
6:00 to 8:00 PM

Location:
At the home of Sara Reilly
2455 Emerald Alley, Eugene
(just south of the university)

Directions: From the corner of 24th and Hilyard, go East on 24th about 5 blocks. Pass University Ave, and Onyx Street. Turn right in the first alley after Onyx (it is unmarked). 2445 Emerald Alley is a big house on the left with a stone wall in front of it. It is about half way down the alley.

Please park on 24th or 25th street because there won’t be room for everyone in front of the house.

Phone: Sara’s number is 345-6770

Please bring a Nourishing Traditions style dish and join us for some great food and great conversation! Families and guests are welcome. Please bring enough food to feed the size of your party and your recipe on a 3×5 card or notepaper.

RSVP if you think you will be attending so that we have a rough idea of how many people to expect (but feel free to just show up).

Our potluck meetings are regularly scheduled on the second Monday of each month. We have changed the day of the meeting this month, as the second Monday falls on the same day as the Wise Traditions 2008 Conference.

We also need volunteers to host the next few potlucks. Let us know if you would like to host one.

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“The Popcorn Review”

“Making Food Storage a Life Style”

by Russ Silver

Friday, November 21, 2008
7:30 to 9:00 PM

Location:
Market of Choice
67 West 29th, Eugene
Upstairs in the Community Room

This is a recording of Russ Silver, a Utah WAPF chapter leader, presenting a class on the topic of putting away food for long term storage. He says in this presentation that at one time he and his wife stored enough food to last them 7 years!

“Making Food Storage a Life Style” DVD was given a thumbs up review in the current issue of the Wise Traditions journal. Below is an excerpt. Please see the Fall 2008 issue for the full review.

He starts off with a brief summary of Dr. Price’s work, then discusses the need for soaking grains. Next, he talks about which are the good fats and explains how to render suet into tallow. At the top of his list of food storage recommendations is cod liver oil (good choice), coconut oil, ghee, and lard (not from the store). Other recommendations include dehydrated fruit and vegetables, canned fish, hard cheese coated with paraffin, jerky, pemmican and seaweed or kelp. He points out that seeds and nuts do not last very long in storage. He also goes into how to make no-kneed bread.

The presentation includes basic information about the principals of the Weston A. Price Foundation with an emphasis on storable foods. So, whether you are serious about food storage, as he is, or just putting away some food to always have on hand or in case of a winter power-outage this DVD has some interesting tips.

We are requesting a $5-10 donation to the Eugene Chapter at the door.
Space is limited, so please contact us to reserve your seat.
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Featured Recipe

Fermented Cranberry Relish

This is a recipe I came up with last year. It got very good reviews from everyone I served it to. The fermentation is optional, but should make it keep longer (if you can keep from eating it all). Recipe makes about 1 pint.

  • 1 bag (12 oz) fresh cranberries
  • zest of 1 orange
  • juice of 1 orange
  • 1/4 tsp ground cinnamon
  • 1/4 c. honey or other natural sweetener
  • 1/2 tsp fresh grated ginger
  • 1/4 tsp unrefined salt
  • 2 TBS whey (optional)

Directions: Place all ingredients except whey (and honey* if using) in saucepan. Cook until cranberries pop and soften and mixture thickens. Let cool until tepid. Add whey and honey and stir. Place into 1-pint jar. Leave about 1/2” headspace. Screw on lid. Label and date.

Optional Fermentation: Let sit at room temperature for 1-2 days. Then place into refrigerator and enjoy.

Variations: adjust spices or add other spices to taste. Add more sweetening if needed, or leave tart by using about 2 TBS sweetener.

* In order to preserve enzymes, I prefer to keep my raw honey unheated.

Note: In the original recipe I used agave syrup as the sweetener, but after reading an article on the making of agave syrup in the summer issue of Wise Traditions I question the use of it. I am planning to try a cooked down pear or apple sauce as the sweetener this year. I’ll let you know how it turns out!

Newsletter – October 2008

From the Editor:

Nourishing Children

My son turns three years old this month. Wow. In many respects it was the thought of having a child that spurred me into organizing WAP potlucks four years ago, and then into becoming a chapter leader. I have always hoped that my son would view eating Nourishing Traditions foods as normal, and that by surrounding ourselves with other people who eat the same way we can create a community in which we don’t have to struggle to defend our way of eating.

Recently I have been looking into childcare/preschool options. I’ve found a number of them that I like, but I keep running into issues around food. I hate to make a big deal about food, and I don’t want him to feel singled out by bringing his own food when others are eating communally, but I know that food is important to health.

Dr. Price describes the difference that just one meal a day can make when he writes about an experiment in which they fed children one nutrition-packed meal a day for 6 days a week.

The nutrition provided these children in this one meal included the following foods. About four ounces of tomato juice or orange juice and a teaspoonful of a mixture of equal parts of a very high vitamin natural cod liver oil and an especially high vitamin butter was given at the beginning of the meal. They then received a bowl containing approximately a pint of a very rich vegetable and meat stew, made largely from bone marrow and fine cuts of tender meat: the meat was usually broiled separately to retain its juice and then chopped very fine and added to the bone marrow meat soup which always contained finely chopped vegetables and plenty of very yellow carrots; for the next course they had cooked fruit, with very little sweetening, and rolls made from freshly ground whole wheat, which were spread with the high-vitamin butter. The wheat for the rolls was ground fresh every day in a motor driven coffee mill. Each child was also given two glasses of fresh whole milk. The menu was varied from day to day by substituting for the meat stew, fish chowder or organs of animals. From time to time, there was placed in a two quart jar a helping similar to that eaten by the children. This was brought to my laboratory for chemical analysis, which analysis showed that these meals provided approximately 1.48 grams of calcium and 1.28 grams of phosphorus in a single helping of each course. Since many of the children doubled up on the course, their intake of these minerals was much higher. I have shown in the preceding chapter that the accepted figures for the requirements of the body for calcium and phosphorus are 0.68 grams of calcium and 1.32 grams of phosphorus. It is obvious that this one meal a day plus the other two meals at home provided a real factor of safety. Clinically this program completely controlled the dental caries of each member of the group.

Several incidents of special interest occurred. Two different teachers came to me to inquire what had been done to make a particular child change from one of the poorest in the class in capacity to learn to one of the best. Dental caries is only one of the many expressions of our modern deficient nutritions.

Weston A. Price, DDS
Nutrition and Physical Degeneration

My vision of healthy childcare is a small operation in someone’s home, with about 5 to 10 children, ages 1 to 5 years (or older). The kids will spend their days making arts, crafts, music, playing outside, and preparing and eating Nourishing Traditions meals together.

Are you a parent who shares this vision? Are you interested in providing such a childcare environment? I am planning a meeting to discuss options on creating such an environment. Email me if you are interested in attending, and I will try to find a day that everyone can come.

~ Lisa

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October Events:

Meeting & Potluck Dinner

Monday, October 13, 2008
6:00 to 8:00 PM

Location:
At the home of Carla Burkhart
2087 Todd St., Eugene

Directions: Take 18th Ave West. Turn left onto Todd Street (Todd St. is west of Oakpatch, and east of Bailey Hill Drive). The house is on the left.

Please bring a Nourishing Traditions style dish and join us for some great food and great conversation! Families and guests are welcome. Please bring enough food to feed the size of your party and your recipe on a 3×5 card or notepaper.

Please RSVP if you think you will be attending so that we have a rough idea of how many people to expect (but feel free to just show up).

Our potluck meetings are regularly scheduled on the second Monday of each month. We will be changing the day of the November meeting as the second Monday falls on the same day as the Wise Traditions 2008 Conference in California. We plan to have the potluck after I return. Details will be in the next newsletter. We also need volunteers to host the next few potlucks.

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“The Popcorn Review”

“Good Digestion: The Key to Good Health”

by Dr. Natasha Campbell-McBride MD.

Friday, October 24, 2008
7:30 to 9:00 PM

Location:
Market of Choice
67 West 29th, Eugene
Upstairs in the Community Room

“Good Digestion: The Key to Good Health” is the second DVD by Dr. Natasha Campbell-McBride. It follows “Gut and Psychology Syndrome” DVD that we showed in July and September. In this presentation she discusses details on how the digestive system functions, and how to begin the GAPS program, with particular emphasis on how to implement the diet.

For more details see:

www.krautpounder.com/inv-pages/gaps.html

 

We are requesting a $5-10 donation to the Eugene Chapter at the door.
Space is limited, so please contact us to reserve your seat.

“All Diseases Begins in the Gut” ~ Hippocrates

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Membership Drive

October is the final month of the fall membership drive for The Weston A. Price Foundation. If you are not already a member please consider becoming one.

By joining WAPF you will:

  1. Receive the quarterly journal Wise Traditions. An information packed publication.
  2. Support The Weston A. Price Foundation, a wonderful organization that is one of the few groups speaking the truth about our need to return to traditional diets.
  3. If you put my name (Lisa Bianco-Davis) as the person who referred you, you will help me win a free membership to the national conference in California next month. You may join at any time, but only memberships received before October 31st will qualify for the contest.

This membership form has my name already on it. Please download the form, print it out, enclose your payment and give it to us at an event this month, or send it to our mailing address.

If you have joined this year and already sent your membership form directly to the Foundation, please email me your name, as it may still qualify.

WAPF Eugene Chapter
c/o Lisa Bianco-Davis
965 Tyinn Street #19
Eugene, OR 97402

We are mailing the forms in together to ensure that they are all counted towards the contest.

If anyone has been waiting to become a member,
now is the time!

Memberships are $40 (or $25 for students and seniors). Membership forms are also available at our local events and on the WAPF website.

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Coming in November

Wise Traditions 2008 Conference

The Wise Traditions 2008 Conference is only one month away! This is from the WAP Foundation.

LAST WEEK FOR PRE-REGISTRATION RATE OF $350

Dear Members,

The special full-conference, pre-registration fee of $350 is available until Friday, OCTOBER 3. And the special conference room rate at the San Francisco Airport Hyatt Regency Hotel is available until OCTOBER 22. So please make your arrangements in a timely manner. Bookings are way ahead of last year and some events (especially the Monday tours) may sell out.

We are looking forward to our best conference ever. I hope to see you there!

Sincerely, Sally Fallon, President

Dates:
Friday, November 7 to Sunday, November 9, 2008
(with additional special events on Monday, November 10th)

Location:
Hyatt San Francisco Airport,
1333 Bayshore Highway
Burlingame, California 94010
(650) 347-1234
www.sanfranciscoairport.hyatt.com

Full Conference Registration for WAPF members $350 (special rate ends this Friday!)

My son & I have a room reserved at a hotel near the conference (less than half mile walk).

The room has 2 queen beds, and a refrigerator (and microwave) for $89/night. We are staying Thursday night through Sunday night, but may also stay longer. We would like to share with one or more non-smoking people.

We will either drive or take a train down from Eugene. Let me know if you are interested in carpooling or sharing a room.

More details about the conference can be found at: www.westonaprice.org/conference/2008/index.html

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Volunteer Opportunities

Volunteer for the Eugene Chapter

Several of you have volunteered to help out now that our Co-Chapter Leader, Victoria, is in Portland.
Thank you! I haven’t known exactly what to ask for at the time, so I’ve put together this list. If you would like to help out, please choose something and let me know what you would like to do.

We need people willing to:

  • Take notes at meetings
  • Help plan food preparation classes
  • Submit class descriptions to newspapers
  • Post fliers on bulletin boards
  • Teach a class segment
  • Phone call people without email
  • Staff a booth at the Eugene Celebration or other events
  • Host a potluck
  • Assist with webpage design and/or updates
  • Bookkeeping using QuickBooks
  • Design of posters and fliers
  • And more… If you have other ideas of ways to help out just let us know